Rory’s Tip

Share or Bookmark:
| More
June 4th, 2008
Rory’s Tip

Grab a thermos of hot coffee, a submarine sandwich and your submersible crappie lights – it’s the Dark of the Moon in June – June 3 that is. Time to enjoy some nocturnal fish catching in the desert lakes.

Here’s a tip – take along your binoculars to sample the star-studded night sky when the fish aren’t biting. You might even spot a satellite. Check with NASA before going at http://science.nasa.gov//realtime/ for satellite tracking information. For instance, on Wednesday, June 4, in the Phoenix area you might be able to see the Space Shuttle Discovery for a minute at 9:44 p.m. crossing the northern sky.

One of my favorite nighttime lakes is Alamo Lake west of Wickenburg. It’s like a giant bowl, easy to navigate at night and the only sources of night sky light pollution is from camp lanterns along the hillside, and most campers go to bed early. Be sure to catch the topwater bass action at last light and first light.

This is also a superb time grab a piece of comfortable shoreline and bottom fish for catfish and carp. The secret to success is to get chummy. Take whatever you are using for bait, and chum in the area you are fishing. These bottom feeders are attracted by scent, so send out an olfactory invitation to your fishing party.

Speaking of cat fishing, we are getting reports of some huge cats being caught, day or night. Catfish and carp are both what we call “under-utilized” resources, which basically means not a lot of people fish for them, yet they are abundant. Hey, and you don’t need a tackle box full of expense lures, just some hooks, slip sinkers, and maybe some hot dogs, corn, chicken liver or prepared stink baits.

By the way, the urban lakes are stocked with catfish. Give them a try.

This is the tail end of the trout fishing season along the Lower Salt River near Phoenix. This desert river is stocked with trout in winter and spring. Right now, it’s mostly a first-light gambit. But it can sure save trout anglers many gallons of expensive gasoline.

For the high country, I am still getting great reports from anglers along the Rim lakes – especially Woods, Bear Canyon, Willow Springs and Knoll – and Big Lake is still a top producer of angler smiles. It tickled me to read about a 3-year-old little girl catching her first fish – a 16-inch rainbow.

Lower Lake Mary is doing a good job of producing limits – we saturated the lake with 28,000 rainbow trout in early spring and they have been growing fat and sassy ever since. Hit it now – this shallow lake can heat up during summer and fishing can get a lot tougher there.

Hey, summer is almost here. The Summer Solstice (first day of summer) is June 20, two days after the full moon.

If you have a great digital fishing photo, send it to me (raikens@azgfd.gov) for the fishing report – especially kids catching fish etc.

Go wet a line. Maybe I’ll see you out there.

Leave a Reply