SOUTHWESTERN ARIZONA FISHING REPORT

Share or Bookmark:
| More
June 24th, 2009

LAKE HAVASU – Striped bass bite improving during the morning hours using blue/white 3/8 to 3/4 Stump jumpers with 4″ hyper tails cast or trolled in the early twilight hours. After sunup switch to
trolled anchovies with fish seekers or 2 oz. banana sinkers. Still fishing cut sardines or anchovies producing numbers of small limits throughout the Windsor basin south to Black Rock.

Smallmouth bass hitting red 8 to 14ft diving crankbaits, wacky rigged finesse worms in oxblood, junebug or red craw colors with a 1/4 oz. drop sinker fished near rocky or gravel bottomed shorelines where bass are preparing to spawn in 4 to 15 ft of water.

This report was provided by John Galbraith of Anglers Pro Shop Lake Havasu City
Hi Rory,

Sorry, but the striper news is bleak this week. Only a few have been taken and those were only around a pound. No news on catfish. There has been some small –1#ers–smallmouth bass picked up from the rocky points. And, the bluegill are in the back bays. Hopefully next week will be better.  A nice catfish with an estimated weight of 10#’s was caught at Catfish Paradise in the Topock Marsh.

Talk to you next time,

Georgia www.captdoyle.com.

Report Provided by: www.HavasuFishing.com. The warmer weather has heated up the water and fishing is greatly improving for almost all species.

Fishing Outlook: Fishing for largemouth bass, as well as smallmouth bass, is expected to be good to excellent this spring. The size will range from 13 inches and up, with an occasional fish greater than 5 pounds.  Striped bass fishing has been problematic this year, with catch rates far below what has been experienced the past couple of years.

Striper fishermen report that they can see schools of striped bass on their fish-finders, but have had poor success getting them to strike, and have not been seeing the boils on shad that they are used to seeing.  Shad numbers are probably lower this year, which affects the striper fishing, as striped bass tend to concentrate mainly on shad.

Remember, shad schools move around, and populations tend to fluctuate, so spots that have been “hot” in the past may no longer be so if the shad have moved elsewhere, or are in lower numbers.  The majority of striped bass in Lake Havasu tend to be smaller fish of 1 to 2 pounds, but the occasional 20-30 pound fish is caught.  Channel catfish as well as bluegill and redear sunfish will be good to excellent.

Lake Havasu is well known for large (2-3 pound) redear sunfish, and with the proliferation of the quagga mussel in the lake, we may see larger numbers of large redears.  Redear sunfish are also known as “shellcrackers,” due to their preference for eating clams and mussels, so they may actually benefit from the presence of the invasive quagga mussel.

There have also been reports of crappie fishing picking up, a species that used to be sought after in the lake, but has declined in recent years.  Flathead catfish fishing should be fair at the lower end of the lake (Bill Williams River Arm) through the spring, although surveys in the fall indicated that they are taking up residence farther north in the lake than in the past. Flathead catfish can reach as high as 40 pounds or better in Lake Havasu. When fishing for them, select the interior points in the coves and the areas where artificial structure has been placed.

The warmer weather causes the bite to increase making crankbaits and topwater lures a good choice.  Also, spinner baits, jigs, cut fish, live shad, etc. should work depending on the species you are looking for.

Take precautions to make sure your boat and equipment is clean before leaving the water to make sure you don’t spread quagga mussels to other waters by accident.  This invasive species certainly has profound effects on water delivery and control structures, boat engines, and likely on fish populations.  Quaggas are abundant and widely distributed in Lake Havasu, but are absent from many of our interior lakes.  Help keep those lakes quagga-free.  Make sure your boat and trailer are free of the mussels, drain all bilge and livewells before leaving the area, and most importantly, let your boat bake in the sun for 3-5 days in the sun before you launch it at another lake.

ALAMO LAKE – Report Courtesy Mark Knapp, Alamo Lake State Park. Well folks,  in a nut shell fishing is pretty good.

Prescott Bass Masters held a 7-boat night tournament here this last weekend.  There tournament started at 7 p.m. and weigh in was at 7ish a.m.   I was only banging on one cup of coffee  when I got the results so I hope I get this right.  Total winning weight was a little over 13 pounds.  Big fish was a little over 5 pounds, and was caught on training wheels ( crankbait) right before dark.  Lots and lots of slot fish were caught all night long using plastics and training wheels. They did pretty good considering a cold front was blowing through at the time.

I have not heard any crappie reports this week.  There’s a full moon going on now so it’s probably a hit and miss thing.  I’m sure things will get back to normal this week and the night bite will be back on.  Anglers have reported catching some decent size catfish in the upper end of the lake using night crawlers.

No reports on shore fishing.  The lake level is at 1122ish I think.  The releases are kind of goofy due to a broken valve inside the dam.   The minimal release you can get when you crack open a gate is about 1000 cfs.  When releases are below 1000 cfs they use what is called a by pass valve.  The by pass valve is a 2 to 3 ft diameter pipe and can be controlled by turning open a gate valve to set the releases at 50 cfs. It’s like using your water spigot to turn on your garden hose.  Anyway, there having trouble with something leaking around the valve and have it turned off.  In the meantime they wait a few days then crack open a gate and make up for the flows that way.  This is whats called a “pulse release”.  You will hear me referring to “pulse releases” until they get the by pass valve fixed. The fish are getting used to this and it really has not affected fishing that I can tell. On average the lake drops about a foot a month due to evaporation and man dated releases. The bummer about pulse releases is that the lake will drop more at one time then with constant releases. We’re keeping a close eye on our ramps and do not foresee any problems at this time. Bigger boats are encouraged to use Cholla Ramp.

Now that we have covered fishing, let’s take a moment and go over a couple of things to check before heading out to any lakes.  It’s that time of year to check the water levels in your batteries.  Two of our last three boat rescues have been over dead batteries.   In both cases the batteries had little to no water in them.  If you need to add water to your batteries then make sure to use distilled water only.   Make sure you not only have life jackets on board but make sure there still in good shape.  Look for tears and holes in them.    Also look for dry rot and mold.   If you find any of the above break down and buy new ones.  Make sure your boat registration is current.  I have spent some time helping out at Lake Havasu State Park and you don’t even get to launch if you don’t have current registration.  It’s takes a matter of minutes to go online and get up to snuff.   Make sure you have the drain plug and it’s in good shape.  Now lets move on to the trailer.  Check the tires for right amount of tire pressure.  If the trailers been sitting all winter then look for dry rot on the tires.  If anything on the tire does not look right then the odds are good your going to have a problem with it.  A good spare tire saves alot of head aches.  My spare tire on my Ranger trailer has never been used on my trailer, but has made several trips around Az to help out fellow anglers.  Be sure to take a minute and squirt some greese into the wheel bearings.   I’m hear to tell yah that taking a minute and going over all the above will save you alot of money and grief in the long run.  On a final note, take a cell phone with you.  I hate cell phones but have learned through the school of hard knocks that they have a purpose in life.  A cheap track phone can be purchased with minutes for around 20 to 30 bucks.   You break down on this lake and have a cell phone WITH you, you just increased your odds of me coming to help you by 98%.  There is a 2 % chance you might not be able to get service, and thats up by the dam.

Well, it’s Sunday afternoon, nippy 98 degrees with winds out of the west, and the fish are callin my name.  I blow this popcicle stand at four, go home, dump the monkey suit and should have the boat on the water by 4:10 (Alamo time).  First cast is scheduled at 4:16 with fish to follow.   Hmmm!  Six minutes from No Wake zone to first honey hole.  I might have just gave up a key piece of information here followed with the word “point.”  I’ll try to do a follow up with this before sending it on to Rory. Follow up: Caught 10 bass total on plastics hiding behind windy points.  One over and the rest were dinks.  All caught in 5 foot of water and in the brush.  Be sure to to put you stuff away.  Out of site out of mind.  I’ll go into this in more detail next week.    Mark.




Angler reports:
Rocky Priddy: Fished 5/16/09 from 7:20 PM to 1:45 AM.
Caught 50 bass and 32 crappies. Fished in main lake tied to tree…used minnows on a slip bobber 12 feet down in 30 feet of water. Largest crappie was 2 lbs and largest bass was 2 lbs.
Matt G.: Lake is on fire — Went out 5/13 pulled out 30 lmb biggest 4#. Any cove is a guaranty hot spot mostly on south End of lake in clearer waters. Caught most on  Swim baits and poppers

Spring Outlook:

Colorado River (Parker Strip Area):

Fishing for smallmouth bass over two pounds in size is expected to be good to excellent.  In addition, redear sunfish should also be good in the pound-plus sizes.   The Parker Strip is well known for its smallmouth bass fishing, especially in the area from the dam to several miles downstream.  The Parker Strip is also home to some really impressive, dinner-plate sized redear sunfish of two pounds or larger.  Channel and flathead catfish fishing is always fair in this section of the Colorado River.  Below the dam, striper fishing should also be fair, using live shad or anchovies.  Largemouth bass are abundant, especially in the downstream portions of the Parker Strip.  Channel and flathead catfish fishing will be fair to good in this section of the Colorado River as the weather warms up.

Take precautions to make sure your boat and equipment is clean before leaving the water to make sure you don’t spread quagga mussels to other water by accident.

Colorado River (between Palo Verde Diversion Dam and Walter’s Camp):

This area should be fair for both smallmouth bass (in the channel) up river from the I-10 Bridge and largemouth bass (in the backwaters) throughout the entire area.  Channel and flathead catfish are always fair to good in this section of the Colorado River.  Most of the flathead catfish will be in the 2 to 5 pound size range with an occasional fish over 40 pounds.  The time for fishing for both species of catfish will be late spring and throughout the summer.  Generally, when fishing for catfish, the hotter the weather, the better the fishing.

This section of the Colorado River, all the way down to Yuma, is where the invasive vegetative species known as Giant Salvinia is located.  Quagga mussels are also found here.  If using a boat, make sure that boats, live wells, engines, and trailers are clean before leaving the area.  The last thing that we want to have happen is the movement of invasive species to other waters.

Colorado River (between Walter’s Camp and Picacho State Park):

This section of the Colorado River is relatively remote and can only be accessed by boat from either end.  Fishing is expected to be good to excellent for flathead catfish with sizes over 40 pounds.  The best time will be late spring and on into the summer (the hotter the better).  The various backwaters will be good for largemouth bass and other sunfish (bluegill and redear).  Other species available in the main river are smallmouth bass, channel catfish, and striped bass.

This section of the Colorado River, all the way down to Yuma, is where the invasive vegetative species known as Giant Salvinia is located.  Quagga mussels are also found here.  If using a boat, make sure that boats, live wells, engines, and trailers are clean before leaving the area.  The last thing that we want to have happen is the movement of invasive species to other waters.

Colorado River (between Picacho State Park and Imperial Dam):

This area is expected to be good to excellent for largemouth bass, channel catfish, and flathead catfish.  Bass and channel catfish in excess of 5 pounds are present along with flathead catfish as large as 40 pounds.  Other sunfish such as bluegill and redear are also present in the various backwaters.  Occasional striped bass will be caught in the backwaters and main river channel.

This section of the Colorado River, all the way down to Yuma, is where the invasive vegetative species known as Giant Salvinia is located.  Quagga mussels are also found here.  If using a boat, make sure that boats, live wells, engines, and trailers are clean before leaving the area.  The last thing that we want to have happen is the movement of invasive species to other waters.

Colorado River (between Laguna and Morelos dams):

This area will be good for largemouth bass and flathead catfish.  Bass in excess of 5 pounds are common and flathead catfish over 20 pounds are a good bet.  In this area, accessibility to the river is dependent on the amount of water being released.  Usually shallow draft boats are a must.  The lower end has had some dredging work done and a larger boat may be able to get on the river in that area.

This section of the Colorado River, all the way down to Yuma, is where the invasive vegetative species known as Giant Salvinia is located.  Quagga mussels are also found here.  If using a boat, make sure that boats, live wells, engines, and trailers are clean before leaving the area.  The last thing that we want to have happen is the movement of invasive species to other waters.

With the increase in border issues and illegal activity on the lower end of this area I would avoid that area (Pilot Knob to Moreles Dam).

Regional Hot Spots:

Alamo Lake will be the hot spot for largemouth bass and channel catfish.  Since there appears to be an overabundance of small bass and channel catfish in the lake at present, we recommend keeping as many of the smaller bass and catfish as you can legally possess in order to try and reduce the population a little.  Next choice would be Lake Havasu for large and smallmouth bass and redears, Parker Strip for smallmouth bass and redear sunfish, and the Colorado River below Walter’s Camp for flathead catfish.  Our spring surveys indicate that there is a very impressive population of flathead catfish in the lower Imperial Division between Picacho State Park and Imperial Dam.  Expect many in the 5-10 pounds size class, but we know of at least one state record lurking in those waters.

If you need any additional information or additional don’t hesitate to contact the Yuma Regional office at (928) 341-4051 and I will be happy to accommodate you.

Leave a Reply