Southwestern Arizona Fishing Report

Share or Bookmark:
| More
July 13th, 2009

LAKE HAVASU – Striped bass bite improving during the morning hours using blue/white 3/8 to 3/4 Stump jumpers with 4″ hyper tails cast or trolled in the early twilight hours. After sunup switch to
trolled anchovies with fish seekers or 2 oz. banana sinkers. Still fishing cut sardines or anchovies producing numbers of small limits throughout the Windsor basin south to Black Rock.

Smallmouth bass hitting red 8 to 14ft diving crankbaits, wacky rigged finesse worms in oxblood, junebug or red craw colors with a 1/4 oz. drop sinker fished near rocky or gravel bottomed shorelines where bass are preparing to spawn in 4 to 15 ft of water.

This report was provided by John Galbraith of Anglers Pro Shop Lake Havasu City

Hi Rory,

Sorry, but the striper news is bleak this week. Only a few have been taken and those were only around a pound. No news on catfish. There has been some small –1#ers–smallmouth bass picked up from the rocky points. And, the bluegill are in the back bays. Hopefully next week will be better.  A nice catfish with an estimated weight of 10#’s was caught at Catfish Paradise in the Topock Marsh.

Talk to you next time,

Georgia www.captdoyle.com.

Report Provided by: www.HavasuFishing.com. The warmer weather has heated up the water and fishing is greatly improving for almost all species.

Fishing Outlook: Fishing for largemouth bass, as well as smallmouth bass, is expected to be good to excellent this spring. The size will range from 13 inches and up, with an occasional fish greater than 5 pounds.  Striped bass fishing has been problematic this year, with catch rates far below what has been experienced the past couple of years.

Striper fishermen report that they can see schools of striped bass on their fish-finders, but have had poor success getting them to strike, and have not been seeing the boils on shad that they are used to seeing.  Shad numbers are probably lower this year, which affects the striper fishing, as striped bass tend to concentrate mainly on shad.

Remember, shad schools move around, and populations tend to fluctuate, so spots that have been “hot” in the past may no longer be so if the shad have moved elsewhere, or are in lower numbers.  The majority of striped bass in Lake Havasu tend to be smaller fish of 1 to 2 pounds, but the occasional 20-30 pound fish is caught.  Channel catfish as well as bluegill and redear sunfish will be good to excellent.

Lake Havasu is well known for large (2-3 pound) redear sunfish, and with the proliferation of the quagga mussel in the lake, we may see larger numbers of large redears.  Redear sunfish are also known as “shellcrackers,” due to their preference for eating clams and mussels, so they may actually benefit from the presence of the invasive quagga mussel.

There have also been reports of crappie fishing picking up, a species that used to be sought after in the lake, but has declined in recent years.  Flathead catfish fishing should be fair at the lower end of the lake (Bill Williams River Arm) through the spring, although surveys in the fall indicated that they are taking up residence farther north in the lake than in the past. Flathead catfish can reach as high as 40 pounds or better in Lake Havasu. When fishing for them, select the interior points in the coves and the areas where artificial structure has been placed.

The warmer weather causes the bite to increase making crankbaits and topwater lures a good choice.  Also, spinner baits, jigs, cut fish, live shad, etc. should work depending on the species you are looking for.

Take precautions to make sure your boat and equipment is clean before leaving the water to make sure you don’t spread quagga mussels to other waters by accident.  This invasive species certainly has profound effects on water delivery and control structures, boat engines, and likely on fish populations.  Quaggas are abundant and widely distributed in Lake Havasu, but are absent from many of our interior lakes.  Help keep those lakes quagga-free.  Make sure your boat and trailer are free of the mussels, drain all bilge and livewells before leaving the area, and most importantly, let your boat bake in the sun for 3-5 days in the sun before you launch it at another lake.

ALAMO LAKE – Report Courtesy Mark Knapp, Alamo Lake State Park. Well folks,  I’m having to write this a couple of days earlier than I would like due to having to go help out fellow rangers at Lake Havasu this coming weekend.   Although working a major holiday at Havasu is both, educational and entertaining, I’m always happy to come home.  Bass fishing has been hit and miss this week.  The top water bite in the early morning has been lousy.  The evening bite has not been much better.  A few anglers have reported catching bass mid morning drop shotting.  Every one is giving crappie fishing a thumbs down.   Shore fishing is o.k.  Anglers are catching a few blue gills and catfish using night crawlers.  I’m not sure what the lake level is but both ramps are in operation.  Bigger boats are encouraged to use Cholla ramp.  Hopefully I’ll have a better report next week.  Mark

Spring Outlook:

Colorado River (Parker Strip Area):

Fishing for smallmouth bass over two pounds in size is expected to be good to excellent.  In addition, redear sunfish should also be good in the pound-plus sizes.   The Parker Strip is well known for its smallmouth bass fishing, especially in the area from the dam to several miles downstream.  The Parker Strip is also home to some really impressive, dinner-plate sized redear sunfish of two pounds or larger.  Channel and flathead catfish fishing is always fair in this section of the Colorado River.  Below the dam, striper fishing should also be fair, using live shad or anchovies.  Largemouth bass are abundant, especially in the downstream portions of the Parker Strip.  Channel and flathead catfish fishing will be fair to good in this section of the Colorado River as the weather warms up.

Take precautions to make sure your boat and equipment is clean before leaving the water to make sure you don’t spread quagga mussels to other water by accident.

Colorado River (between Palo Verde Diversion Dam and Walter’s Camp):

This area should be fair for both smallmouth bass (in the channel) up river from the I-10 Bridge and largemouth bass (in the backwaters) throughout the entire area.  Channel and flathead catfish are always fair to good in this section of the Colorado River.  Most of the flathead catfish will be in the 2 to 5 pound size range with an occasional fish over 40 pounds.  The time for fishing for both species of catfish will be late spring and throughout the summer.  Generally, when fishing for catfish, the hotter the weather, the better the fishing.

This section of the Colorado River, all the way down to Yuma, is where the invasive vegetative species known as Giant Salvinia is located.  Quagga mussels are also found here.  If using a boat, make sure that boats, live wells, engines, and trailers are clean before leaving the area.  The last thing that we want to have happen is the movement of invasive species to other waters.

Colorado River (between Walter’s Camp and Picacho State Park):

This section of the Colorado River is relatively remote and can only be accessed by boat from either end.  Fishing is expected to be good to excellent for flathead catfish with sizes over 40 pounds.  The best time will be late spring and on into the summer (the hotter the better).  The various backwaters will be good for largemouth bass and other sunfish (bluegill and redear).  Other species available in the main river are smallmouth bass, channel catfish, and striped bass.

This section of the Colorado River, all the way down to Yuma, is where the invasive vegetative species known as Giant Salvinia is located.  Quagga mussels are also found here.  If using a boat, make sure that boats, live wells, engines, and trailers are clean before leaving the area.  The last thing that we want to have happen is the movement of invasive species to other waters.

Colorado River (between Picacho State Park and Imperial Dam):

This area is expected to be good to excellent for largemouth bass, channel catfish, and flathead catfish.  Bass and channel catfish in excess of 5 pounds are present along with flathead catfish as large as 40 pounds.  Other sunfish such as bluegill and redear are also present in the various backwaters.  Occasional striped bass will be caught in the backwaters and main river channel.

This section of the Colorado River, all the way down to Yuma, is where the invasive vegetative species known as Giant Salvinia is located.  Quagga mussels are also found here.  If using a boat, make sure that boats, live wells, engines, and trailers are clean before leaving the area.  The last thing that we want to have happen is the movement of invasive species to other waters.

Colorado River (between Laguna and Morelos dams):

This area will be good for largemouth bass and flathead catfish.  Bass in excess of 5 pounds are common and flathead catfish over 20 pounds are a good bet.  In this area, accessibility to the river is dependent on the amount of water being released.  Usually shallow draft boats are a must.  The lower end has had some dredging work done and a larger boat may be able to get on the river in that area.

This section of the Colorado River, all the way down to Yuma, is where the invasive vegetative species known as Giant Salvinia is located.  Quagga mussels are also found here.  If using a boat, make sure that boats, live wells, engines, and trailers are clean before leaving the area.  The last thing that we want to have happen is the movement of invasive species to other waters.

With the increase in border issues and illegal activity on the lower end of this area I would avoid that area (Pilot Knob to Moreles Dam).

Regional Hot Spots:

Alamo Lake will be the hot spot for largemouth bass and channel catfish.  Since there appears to be an overabundance of small bass and channel catfish in the lake at present, we recommend keeping as many of the smaller bass and catfish as you can legally possess in order to try and reduce the population a little.  Next choice would be Lake Havasu for large and smallmouth bass and redears, Parker Strip for smallmouth bass and redear sunfish, and the Colorado River below Walter’s Camp for flathead catfish.  Our spring surveys indicate that there is a very impressive population of flathead catfish in the lower Imperial Division between Picacho State Park and Imperial Dam.  Expect many in the 5-10 pounds size class, but we know of at least one state record lurking in those waters.

If you need any additional information or additional don’t hesitate to contact the Yuma Regional office at (928) 341-4051 and I will be happy to accommodate you.

One Response to “Southwestern Arizona Fishing Report”

  1. Caught a 30 pound flattie on a big waterdog at Alamo on Sunday.

Leave a Reply